Your CIS Contacts:

Laura Fox
Undergraduate Assistant
Office: 308 Levine
Phone: 215-8-3191
Email: lffox@cis.upenn.edu

Jackie Caliman
Associate Director for Advising
Office: 309 Levine
Phone: 215-8-5326
Email: jackie@cis.upenn.edu

Dr. Stephanie Weirich
Undergraduate Curriculum Chair
Office: 510 Levine
Phone: 215-573-2821

 

 

CIS Undergraduate Program

Majors: Bachelor of Science in Engineering (BSE) Degrees

The Bachelor of Science in Engineering (BSE) is a traditional engineering degree that prepares students for careers in professional engineering, computer science or digital media design.

Computer Science (CSCI)

A Penn Engineering degree in Computer Science provides students with an in-depth education in the conceptual foundations of computer science and in complex software and hardware systems. It allows them to explore the connections between computer science and a variety of other disciplines in engineering and outside. Combined with a strong education in mathematics, sciences and the liberal arts, it prepares students to be leaders in computer science practice, to create applications for other disciplines or research and to pursue an array of careers, advanced degrees or personal interests at the vanguard of technological innovation. Learn more.

Computer Engineering (CMPE)

Penn's Computer Engineering (CMPE) major is an innovative and timely degree program, preparing students for a wide range of career opportunities and the kind of intellectual entrepreneurship that is fast shaping the future. In classes led by Penn Engineering's renowned faculty from the Departments of Computer and Information Science and Electrical and Systems Engineering, students combine study of the fundamentals of automated information processing and control with rigorous engineering design and optimization, link theory with practice through hands-on experiments and design a new approach to a real-world problem in a yearlong senior design project. Learn more or contact Amy Calhoun, Program Coordinator, or Andre DeHon, Curriculum Chair.

Digital Media Design (DMD)

Computer-generated imagery is transforming communication, from educational software and motion picture special effects to architectural simulations and medical visualizations. Penn Engineering, in collaboration with the University's Annenberg School for Communication and the School of Design, created the Digital Media Design (DMD) program, an elite Bachelor of Science in Engineering (BSE) degree program for a small number of students. The program is designed to educate a new generation of experts in computer graphics: people who, through their combined education in engineering, design, and communications, are prepared to be and to collaborate effectively with technologists and artists. Students in the program participate in one or two summers of real-world experience in a major multimedia industry. Learn more or contact Amy Calhoun, Program Coordinator.

Networked & Social Systems Engineering (NETS)

The Rajendra and Neera Singh Program in Networked & Social Systems Engineering (NETS), is the world's first course of study to fully integrate the disciplines needed to design and analyze the complex networks that are reshaping our society. To understand the Internet, to predict behavior on it, and to design new capabilities and services for it, we must study it as an assembly of people and systems, interlinked by a technological network with particular structure and properties.  These are the foci of the Singh Program , which studies networked interactions of all varieties, and pays particular attention to the interplay of technology, economics and sociology in networked settings. Learn more or contact Amy Calhoun, Program Coordinator, or Zack Ives, Curriculum Chair.

Majors: Bachelor of Applied Science (BAS) Degrees

The Bachelor of Applied Science (BAS) is a degree option that offers students breadth and allows them to combine a technology-based degree with considerable course work in the liberal arts, communications, or fine arts. This degree is designed primarily for students whose interests are not oriented toward a professional engineering career.

Computer Science (ASCS)

Utilize, analyze and create information processing systems for whatever career, advanced education, or personal interests you choose to pursue. A degree in computer science provides students with an in-depth education in the conceptual foundations of computer science and in complex software and hardware systems. It allows them to explore the connections between computer science and a variety of other disciplines in engineering and outside. A BAS in computer science combines knowledge of technology with an understanding of human and social values, and is designed for students who do not plan to work as professional engineers, and want a customized education which combines the liberal arts and technology in a manner unique to their career goals. Learn more.

Computational Biology (ASCB)

Intertwine the disciplines of computer science, biology, chemistry, genetics and statistics to study biological systems and address problems inspired by biology. A BAS in Computational Biology requires that students augment a basic computer science curriculum with courses in biology, chemistry, genetics and statistics. This program has a year-long capstone course in computational biology that is co-taught by faculty in computer science, biology and genetics. Learn more.

Computer and Cognitive Science (ASCC)

Study the mind and behavior using the engineering discipline of computer science and incorporating the areas of neuroscience, linguistics, psychology, philosophy, sociology and biology, just to name a few. Cognitive science is a science of mental information processing that requires collaborative research in several disciplines. In the cognitive science program at Penn Engineering, the opportunity exists for studying a diversity of subjects which satisfy personal desires, developing a broad foundation for adapting to new societal demands, and maintaining flexibility for moving into new areas of interest if a change in personal career direction develops. Learn more.

Additional Options

In all programs, the opportunity exists for the study of a diversity of subjects which satisfy personal desires, the development of a broad foundation for adapting to new societal demands, and the flexibility for moving into new areas of interest if a change in personal career direction develops. Several options exist for students to customize their undergraduate experience. Learn more about these programs here.