CIS Seminars & Events

Fall 2018 Colloquium Series

Welcome to our Fall 2018 Colloquium Series.  Our lectures are held weekly on Tuesday or Thursday from 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. in Wu and Chen Auditorium, Levine Hall, unlless otherwise noted.  Abstracts and bios will be added soon.



Thursday, Sep 27th

Pamela Zave

Department of Computer Science

Princeton University

"The compositional architecture of the Internet"

Read Abstract and Bio

Abstract:

In 1992 the explosive growth of the World Wide Web began.  In 1993 the last major change was made to the ``classic'' Internet architecture.  Since then the Internet has been adapted to handle a truly impressive list of additional applications and unforeseen challenges, at global scale.  Although the architecture of the Internet has changed drastically, the way that experts talk about it has not changed.  As a result, there is no adequate foundation for re-using solution patterns, verifying trustworthy network services, or evolving toward a better Internet.

This talk introduces a new formal model of networking, based on flexible composition of modular networks.  Each module is a microcosm of networking, with all of the basic structures and mechanisms.  The new model provides precise, consistent descriptions of how the Internet works today.  It also shows that a new network is usually added to the Internet architecture because there is a need for a capability that is intrinsically difficult to implement in the classic architecture, or because there is a need to maintain several distinct views (membership, topology, trust, etc.) of the same network.  Layered architectures can be simpler than flattened ones, and also more efficient.

Technological advances are rapidly making most network components programmable.  In this context, the new model could be used to implement re-usable, customizable infrastructure.  Currently we are using it to investigate the interactions among services (such as secure communication or mobility) and architectural features (such as middleboxes or cloud computing), in pursuit of proof structures and better 

compositional designs.

Bio

Pamela Zave received the AB degree in English from Cornell University and the PhD degree in computer sciences from the University of Wisconsin--Madison.  She has held positions at the University of Maryland,
Bell Laboratories, and AT&T Laboratories, and is now at Princeton University.  She is an ACM Fellow, an AT&T Fellow, and the 2017 winner of the IEEE Computer Society's Harlan D. Mills Award.  Her work on the foundations of requirements engineering has been recognized with three Ten-Year Most Influential Paper awards.  At AT&T, she led a group that developed two successful large-scale telecommunication systems based on her Distributed Feature Composition architecture, including AT&T's first public voice-over-IP offering.  She has been chair of IFIP Working Group 2.3 on Programming Methodology, and holds 30 patents.  Her current interests focus on network architecture and verification of distributed systems.

 

 




 

Tuesday. Oct 9th

Jack Stankovic

Department of Computer Science

University of Virginia

"Research Challenges and Solutions for IOTT/CPS"

Read Abstract and Bio

Abstract:

As the Internet of Things (IOT) matures and supports increasingly sophisticated applications, the research needs for IOT also expand considerably. This talk discusses several major research challenges for the future IOT where trillions of devices are connected to the Internet; call it the Internet of Trillions of Things (IOTT). A brief discussion on the relationship of IOTT, to Cyber Physical Systems (CPS), and Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) is presented. Research topics covered include systems of systems, the impact of massive scaling, and IOTT for healthcare. Smart cities are used to present examples of new system of system research issues and their solutions. Scaling and long time maintenance problems give rise to the need for runtime validation. How to accomplish this is presented. We use the Internet of Healthcare Things to identify the realisms that must be addressed in real home deployments. We also discuss the problems and solutions for using speech as a major sensing modality for smart healthcare based on an emo2vec (an extension to word2vec) and LSTMs. The list of topics is not meant to be comprehensive, but does address some of the main research issues in IOTT/CPS.

Brief Bio: Professor John A. Stankovic is the BP America Professor in the Computer Science Department at the University of Virginia. He served as Chair of the department for 8 years. He is a Fellow of both the IEEE and the ACM. He has been awarded an Honorary Doctorate from the University of York for his work on real-time systems. He won the IEEE Real-Time Systems Technical Committee's Award for Outstanding Technical Contributions and Leadership. He also received the IEEE Technical Committee on Distributed Processing's Distinguished Achievement Award (inaugural winner). He has seven Best Paper awards, including one for ACM SenSys 2006. Stankovic has an h-index of 115 and over 56,000 citations. In 2015 he was awarded the Univ. of Virginia Distinguished Scientist Award, and in 2010 the School of Engineering’s Distinguished Faculty Award. He also received a Distinguished Faculty Award from the University of Massachusetts. He has given more than 40 Keynote talks at conferences and many Distinguished Lectures at major Universities. He also served on the National Academy’s Computer Science Telecommunications Board. He was the Editor-in-Chief for the IEEE Transactions on Distributed and Parallel Systems and was founder and co-editor-in-chief for the Real-Time Systems Journal. His research interests are in real-time systems, wireless sensor networks, smart and connected health, cyber physical systems, and the Internet of Things. Prof. Stankovic received his PhD from Brown University .

 



 

 



 

 

Thursday, Oct 11th

Lothar Thiele

Department Information Technology and Electrical Engineering

ETH Zurich

Read Abstract and Bio

Abstract:

If visions and forecasts of industry come true then we will be soon
surrounded by billions of interconnected embedded devices. We
expect dependable results from sensing, computation, communication
and actuation due to economic importance or even catastrophic
consequences if the overall system is not working correctly.
Trustworthiness and reliability are mandatory for the societal
acceptance of human-cyber interaction and cooperation.

It will be argued that we need novel architectural concepts to
satisfy the strongly conflicting requirements and associated design
challenges of platforms for cyber-pyhsical systems: Handle at the
same time limited available resources, adaptive run-time behavior,
and predictability. These challenges concern all components of a
distributed embedded system, e.g., computation, storage, wireless
communication, energy management, harvesting, sensing and sensor
interfaces, and actuation. The talk will present some novel models
and methods that help to reach the above-mentioned goals as well as
examples from various application domains such as environmental
sensing.

Brief Bio: Lothar Thiele joined ETH Zurich, Switzerland, as a Professor of Computer Engineering, in 1994. His research interests include
models, methods and software tools for the design of embedded
systems, internet of things, cyberphysical systems, sensor
networks, embedded software and bioinspired optimization
techniques.

Lothar Thiele reveived the "Outstanding Young Author Award"
of the IEEE Circuits and Systems Society in 1987, the Browder J.
Thompson Memorial Award of the IEEE in 1988, and the "IBM
Faculty Partnership Award" in 2000/2001. In 2005, he was the
recipient of the Honorary Blaise Pascal Chair of University
Leiden, The Netherlands. Lothar Thiele received the "EDAA
Lifetime Achievement Award" in 2015. Since 2017, Lothar Thiele is
Associate Vice President of ETH Zurich for Digital Transformation.

 

 

 



 

 




Tuesday, Oct 16th

Eva Tardos

Department of Computer Science

Cornell University

Tuesday, Oct 23rd:

Aditya Akella

Department of Computer Science

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Read Abstract and Bio

Abstract:

As the Internet of Things (IOT) matures and supports increasingly sophisticated applications, the research needs for IOT also expand considerably. This talk discusses several major research challenges for the future IOT where trillions of devices are connected to the Internet; call it the Internet of Trillions of Things (IOTT). A brief discussion on the relationship of IOTT, to Cyber Physical Systems (CPS), and Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) is presented. Research topics covered include systems of systems, the impact of massive scaling, and IOTT for healthcare. Smart cities are used to present examples of new system of system research issues and their solutions. Scaling and long time maintenance problems give rise to the need for runtime validation. How to accomplish this is presented. We use the Internet of Healthcare Things to identify the realisms that must be addressed in real home deployments. We also discuss the problems and solutions for using speech as a major sensing modality for smart healthcare based on an emo2vec (an extension to word2vec) and LSTMs. The list of topics is not meant to be comprehensive, but does address some of the main research issues in IOTT/CPS.

Brief Bio: Professor John A. Stankovic is the BP America Professor in the Computer Science Department at the University of Virginia. He served as Chair of the department for 8 years. He is a Fellow of both the IEEE and the ACM. He has been awarded an Honorary Doctorate from the University of York for his work on real-time systems. He won the IEEE Real-Time Systems Technical Committee's Award for Outstanding Technical Contributions and Leadership. He also received the IEEE Technical Committee on Distributed Processing's Distinguished Achievement Award (inaugural winner). He has seven Best Paper awards, including one for ACM SenSys 2006. Stankovic has an h-index of 115 and over 56,000 citations. In 2015 he was awarded the Univ. of Virginia Distinguished Scientist Award, and in 2010 the School of Engineering’s Distinguished Faculty Award. He also received a Distinguished Faculty Award from the University of Massachusetts. He has given more than 40 Keynote talks at conferences and many Distinguished Lectures at major Universities. He also served on the National Academy’s Computer Science Telecommunications Board. He was the Editor-in-Chief for the IEEE Transactions on Distributed and Parallel Systems and was founder and co-editor-in-chief for the Real-Time Systems Journal. His research interests are in real-time systems, wireless sensor networks, smart and connected health, cyber physical systems, and the Internet of Things. Prof. Stankovic received his PhD from Brown University.

 

 

 



 

 




Thursday, Nov 1st:

Babak Falsafi

Computer & Communication Sciences

EPFL

Tuesday, Nov 6th:

Jeff Bilmes

Department of Electrical Engineering

University of Washington

Tuesday, Dec 4th:

Dinesh Manocha

Department of Computer Science

University of Maryland