Using XLisp (Windows)

Starting up

Double-click on the file XLWIN32.EXE. (Older machines may need to use XLISPWIN.EXE instead.)

Quitting

Use the function (exit).

Loading a file

If your file is named, for example, test.lsp, you can do any of the following:

Reloading a file

  1. Use any convenient editor to modify your file, and save it.
  2. Make sure your file still has the .lsp extension. (If it doesn't, consider finding a better editor.)
  3. Return to Lisp and just load the file again.

Creating a transcript

Under XLisp, the dribble command only copies Lisp's output to a file, not your commands. So it's pretty useless. I'm still trying to find a good solution--check back!

Recovering from errors

Hit ctrl-c to return to the top level.

Using Liquid Common Lisp (Suns)

Starting up

  1. Start up Telnet Eniac from the desktop.
  2. Log in.
  3. Navigate to the folder containing your Lisp file.
  4. Enter lisp at the prompt.

Quitting

  1. Use the function (quit).
  2. Type exit at the prompt to close the telnet session.
  3. Close the telnet window.

Loading a file

If your file is named, for example, test.lsp, enter (load "test.lsp") at the Lisp prompt.

You will get an error message such as Warning: File "test.lsp" does not begin with IN-PACKAGE. You can safely ignore this message; we aren't going to explore Lisp's use of packages.

Reloading a file

  1. Hit ctrl-Z to temporarily leave Lisp.
  2. Use any convenient editor to modify your file, and save it.
  3. Return to Lisp by typing fg (stands for "foreground") at the UNIX prompt, and just load the file again.

Creating a transcript

To create a transcript named, say, "transcript", enter the command (dribble "transcript") at the Lisp prompt. Unlike XLisp, this copies all subsequent activity to the named file, giving you a complete transcript.

Recovering from errors

Lisp gives you a list of options, such as:

:C  0: Try evaluating BAR again
:A  1: Return to level 2.
    2: Try evaluating FOO again
    3: Return to level 1.

Find the line that says Return to Level 1. and type just the number (in this case, 3) at the Lisp prompt.