CIT 591 Previous Announcements
Fall 2013, David Matuszek

Date Announcements
October 19, 2013

I've posted a significantly improved version of my Concise Guide to Scala GUIs.

The wording in the Mastermind assignment was slightly confusing. I've changed it to read:
"Your GUI should be on a file named MastermindGuiYourName and the file should define an object with the same name. That object should contain a main method."

October 17, 2013 I've posted my Lojban code.
October 12, 2013 I've updated and posted my Concise Introduction to Scala.
September 10, 2013

Code that isn't reasonably formatted can be very difficult to read. The harder it is to read, the less likely you are to get help quickly. So format any code you post in Piazza!

There is a code button that you can use, when you are in the "Rich text editor." I haven't had good luck with it.

As an alternative, you can click use plain text editor, then put <pre> immediately before your code and </pre> immediately after your code; this will preserve all your spacing, lines, and indentation. Personally, I find this much easier than using the code button.

Why didn't I post this in Piazza? Because I couldn't! There seems to be no way to persuade Piazza to display the five-character sequence < p r e > without turning it into a code block.

September 4, 2013

MCIT Social Hour
Thursday, September 5, 6:00 to ?? in Levine 307.
Food! Beer! Dancing!...Okay, probably not dancing, but food (some of it vegetarian).

CIT 591 Beginner's section
We'll try to meet at 5:00, probably somewhere on the third floor of Towne (TBD).

September 1, 2013

In the REPL, readLine(prompt) does not echo the user's input as it is being typed. Here's a workaround:

  1. Enter the command :power to set "power user mode." You only need to do this once per session.
  2. Instead of readLine(prompt), use repl.in.readLine(prompt).

As the "repl" in the name indicates, this method is for use in the REPL. In "real" programs, readLine(prompt) works just fine.

Before the start of classes

CIT 590 and CIT 591 are both introductory programming courses. CIT 591 is reserved for MCIT students, while CIT 590 may be taken by non-MCIT students.

In previous semesters, CIT 590 and CIT 591 have had identical content: Python, followed by Java. However, in Fall 2013,

  • CIT 590 will remain unchanged, as these are the best languages for most students to know.
  • CIT 591 will cover Scala, followed by Java.
    Scala is a more modern language that will provide a better foundation for students whose area of concentration is computer science; Java continues to be one of the most popular languages.

For MCIT students, CIT 590 remains an acceptable substitute for CIT 591.